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Community Input

August 15, 2018 - Kick‐Off Meeting

  • Focus on the words of the community with progressive proactivity
  • Priorities/vision----policy changes and system of reform to be in place to model a robust system for what to do to help true reform
  • More programming and less incarceration or violations, more usage of CBOs as alternatives for youth development, intervention and diversion
  • My priority is to first and foremost keep our kids safe, to divert youth away fro probation systems in every way possible and to enable the community to rehabilitate our youth and adults in cases where diversion is not possible. I want to see complete, meaningful reform that structures probation systems to address healing and rehabilitation of complex human beings
  • Juvenile camp consolidation, too many youth incarcerated, length of probation terms, overhaul of JJCPA plan, Probation contracting barriers, too many Probation staff given the number of youth on probation/incarcerated
  • Mindful, thoughtful, comprehensive culturally inclusive of youth and family, community centered approach to supporting youth/young adult development, transition process, job readiness, and pipeline to success (as defined by youth) economic prosperity for young people and their futures. Policy reform to completely abolish youth incarceration practice and promote intervention/prevention practices to lead youth/family/community into of success
  • Professionalism and training for staff, community involvement (Whittier)
  • Support continued reform of the Probation Dept. number provided
  • Interested and concerned about the quality of the reform measures being offered by this body. Our community is frequently engaged in reforming the criminal justice system. By reforming of bail and implementing a pre-trial assessment that works for the residents of LA County communities. Our communities are strongly invested in all reforms affecting our neighborhoods
  • Impacted member of the community, family reunification, employment prep, transition housing, placement, employment to sustain living in Los Angeles
  • To see positive change in the Probation system
  • Complete elimination of all justice related fines and fees, especially cash bail
  • Generate justice in my community
  • CBO leader
  • I see the POC having more power that Sheriffs oversight committee, actively monitoring transparency, subpoena power etc They work for the community
  • Interested in ensuring that those who are directly impacted by Probation are continuously a part of the conversation
  • I am here because its’ my passion to help reform the Probation and Parole department, to give back to my community, to assist with the evolution of this reform and to be a voice for my people/community
  • Provide school based mentorship for probation/at-risk of probation youth. A community of over 350 mentors in LA, we partner with some of the most innovative organizations such as NETFLIX and BUZZ FEED, TOYOTA etc. MANTORSHIP
  • Improved outcomes for disconnected youth, culturally competent support services for offenders, self-actualization of offenders priorities, intelligent diversion of juvenile offenders, approaches that humanize offenders
  • After care, healing , represent a voice of returning citizens work opportunities
  • Positive change made to the Probation Dept. that will provide resources and fair treatment. The fines mandated by Probation office cause unnecessary strain and stress upon individuals
  • To see transparency and enhanced engagement of community partners and residents
  • Working specifically to reform the juvenile Probation department by repurposing detention facilities into spaces of opportunity and spaces that satisfactorily reduce recidivism rather than increase it
  • Reducing the bail schedule that has been set by trial Judges (focused on misdemeanors and non-violent felonies)
  • Was in probation as a youth, would like to see different youth practices to empower youth
  • To see currently incarcerated and recently released individuals are involved in the determination of what types of POC functions are established and/or how pre-existing goals should be modified
  • Probation to be the leader in re-entry efforts throughout LA County
  • Too many family friends and neighbors have been highly impacted by probation stipulations that are very grievous to actually live-do-fulfill. Disparities are quite evident based upon demographics socio-economics and available information/insights of the Probation Dept.
  • For Probation to 1. make sure all persons sign up to vote (register) and 2. Provide readily services to women who have children with childcare, waive all fees
  • A robust commission as a resource not an obligation or burden for serving youth and adults well
  • To decrease the criminalization of youth and adults and for real true rehabilitation w/ re-entry resources for those plagued with this system against black and brown people.
  • Work county-wide with incarcerated and formerly incarcerated youth who live in Koreatown and Silverlake. De-incarceration strategies, strong guidance for civil rights protections, meaningful community ownership structures for oversight
  • A robust oversight Commission that can empower real change and support the department and county to achieve it
  • Financial cost of surveillance tools, ankle monitors for probation, pretrial services need for cultural competency and home grown service provider network
  • Comprehensive prevention services and resources, diversion, re-entry net-work in county that meets the needs of the number of adult and youth probationers. Close youth camps and detention centers and replace risk assessments and tools with meaningful services and guidelines rehabilitation and safety
  • More transparency of Probation Dept. effective oversight, i.e. control and budget, better staff accountability, training, more attention to mental health needs of both juveniles and adults, all of the above informed by my experience
  • I have a huge interest in how oversight of the Probation Dept. is enacted. As far as a priority, any meaningful level of civilian oversight. This department has been broken for decades
  • Advocate and family member of probationers, hope a Probation Dept. that is the leader in re-entry helping people to clear records and connect to real services while on probation
  • New robust hiring, training and promotional processes, leadership development within our county building/funding community based services. Authentic oversight with consequences
  • Government leader
  • I have focused the last 10 years on organizational effectiveness. My passion and purpose is to lend my efforts and expertise in a different industry to ensure that the youth of our county are served to help them correct their lives and become a productive part of our society
  • Making sure Probation Officers are well informed about the resources for their clients., those resource are funded and that there is accountability for government agents as well as the human factor that often seems to be missing when discussions are made that affect people’s lives, families and entire communities
  • Leverage the role of the arts in contributing to probation reform efforts, improving outcomes for probation involved youth and adults and improving our communities
  • Treat youth with respect and dignity. End use of pepper spray on youth. This will help build trust with Department Probation Officers plus their safety will increase
  • I want to see constant progress measured by improved lives. Services that are specific to the needs of folks
  • Court services, improved data, stronger partnerships between Probation and community through transparency
  • Review probation budget, identify dollars to divert directly to community for prevention and intervention, end school-based probation program, with decrease in youth incarceration, review juvenile probation personnel, ensure that all practices in juvenile hall/camps respect fundamental human rights

September 25, 2018, Mission And Community Engagement Mandate Of POC

Icebreaker:

Icebreaker # 1: What does public accountability and transparency mean to you?

-Name (District): unlisted

Accountability to me at this time means to work together to help build a better community. The transparency means for us to keep the doors open to all designs of unity and working together with all nations and remapping the laws for areas with problems and broken homes. Also working on jobs without felony checks at least with reasoning for decision.

-Name (District): unlisted

Meetings should be informative. Everyone should follow certain ground rules and communication before any implementations moving forward take place. Keep up to date information available to the community.

-Name (District): unlisted

Public accountability includes a commission that includes impacted community members. It means transparency around Department budget with input from the commission and an accountability for outcomes for Department programs. Transparency means meaningful powers to compel department production, unlimited access to facilities and the requirement for public responses and data sharing by the department.

-Name (District): unlisted

Accountability is a mechanism for holding the Probation Department to a mission that reduces system contact, addresses racial and ethnic disparities while promoting public safety through investing in communities and community based supports. Transparency is a mechanism for maximizing public access to a maximal amount of data and information about department practices and outcomes and facilitating public engagement with and recommendations about the current reality.

-Name (District): unlisted

Nothing without the ability to make changes if transparency is shown to be negative. The public’s ability to hold parties accountable is necessary to mitigate problems that will arise in the attempt to be transparent.

-Name (District): unlisted

Results based community informed outcomes that are creating a measurable difference for youth BEFORE they are criminalized through the justice system. This is inclusive of youth voices, direct service providers and the visible leadership from county supervisors.

-Jacob J. (Youth Justice Coalition)

What it means is to close jails down, the community should be able to make the budget, Probation and youth should be able to work with each other. Nothing to be hidden in the process of wording. The ability for the community to never be blind sighted.

-Phal Suk. (Youth4justice.org) phal.suk@youth4justice.org

-The Probation Oversight Commission should include members who have been directly impacted by the system, including those with felony records.

-The Commission should have control of the Probation Department’s budget.

-The POC should have full access, unannounced to all facilities and authority to compel the release of information and documents from Probation.

-The POC should have unfettered access to the complaint process and be charged with complaint oversight, including decisions and outcomes.

-The POC should have full oversight over all training of Probation staff with authority to design a training program that involves community members giving the training, including those with felony records.

-Zahria Thomas (JC 1)

To me public accountability looks like the public holding themselves accountable. Transparency looks like being able to know what goes on in the community, Probation to know how many people are on probation and how many people need help in the community.

-Cam’Ron George (YJC) 818-770-6843 (This person has another feedback from district 2 so I assumed he is from district 2).

We should hold our PO accountable by helping us look for jobs to help us stay out of jail. They should help us become what we want to become in life instead of being too quick to throw us back into jail. They can help me by giving me tudoring. By checking on me because they believe in me not just because it is their job.

-Darlene Hunt (Coco + NCNW)

Giving trust to the public that you are being fair to all. Not being dishonest.

-Berklee Donavan (District 2)

Accountability and Transparency is when the Probation Department treats its clients with respect and evidence based practices to assist them in making a change in their lives. Then, allowing the public to know of these practices and provide feedback to the department.

-Name (District): unlisted

Means thinking what is best for those directly impacted by decisions and how to meet their needs without having sneaky, behind the scenes motives.

-Dominique Davis (All of us or None):

Public accountability means being held accountable for when mistakes are made they are corrected and noted and not pushed to the side. For example when it comes to juveniles, they should not be taken in for non-violent crimes but counseled. When probation clients are tested and are found dirty, they should be rehabilitated in a drug program and not violated. Probation should focus on truly rehabilitating clients rather than simply locking them up. Probation clients need employment, housing, healthy and educational stability to truly be rehabilitated.

Transparency to me means a clear understanding, a clear vision and a clear message to truly rehabilitate, rebuild and reconnect those formerly incarcerated with their community, themselves and their family.

-Name (District): unlisted

Accountability and transparency looks like public access to all documents that relate to any pertinent matters. Develop a process to report incidents to neutral based organization. Establish a subpoena and investigative process.

-Name (District): unlisted

Having the ability to access visual evidence to any violent incidents that occurred against the citizen or inmate. Increase public accountability and transparency for probation.

-Edson Rufeno (District not listed)

Things that happen in camp that youth can’t get out to the public.

-Name (District): unlisted

Public Accountability means gratitude, grace, clear expectations and expected outcomes. Solution oriented. Transparency should be non-judgmental, a willingness to receive constructive criticism, love, patience and grace.

-Name (District): unlisted

Public administration listening to and implementing the needs of the community being served.

-Elizabeth Lopez (District 1)

Clearly inform and engage community stakeholders and ensure that the process is defined and always available for the public to consume. Also, it represents a means for empowerment and growth for communities. Also clear and measurable systems to balance goals, expectations, and outcomes (next steps, timely, empathetic process, recognizing the past/history, equitable approaches.

-Name (District): unlisted

Agenda and goals set o be driven by community. Information communicated to the public in a clear and accessible way.

-Name (District): unlisted

It looks like meetings and sessions where different stakeholders regularly come together to discuss difficult issues, topics and potential solutions. It is also a place where people with opposing viewpoints have intentional discussion about why certain beliefs are helpful and compromise can be reached after productive discussions.

-Name (District): unlisted

Public Accountability to me means helping my community out when there is a need that needs to be met. No matter the gender or sexual orientation of someone, you and I should always be ready to lend a helping hand.

-Olivia Mitchell (District #2)

Small groups

-Chris (Coco) District: unlisted

Willing to allow the community to be a part of the process and answer to the community for its actions or lack of actions. Transparency should include nothing hidden in the process or the language and wording.

-Robert Crain, District: unlisted

Upholding the obligation of public service; service comes in different forms, but all service without measurable levels of empathy and without respect to environmental circumstance is a disservice to those seeking transparency, meaning that if the waters are muddy who can SEE!

-Zoe (PRC) District: unlisted

It means less money spent on outcomes that don’t help on suppression and incarceration and more on education and economic transportation and health supports at the community level. It also means remedies for abuses of power.

-The Hurt Help Group, (D)

Please focus more on Intervention, Prevention and Reentry.

-Selena from All Of Us Or None (District 4)

This means nothing being hidden, example: no closed door meetings. The availability that we are welcome to the table and accepted.

-Phillip Lester (ARC) District: Unlisted

Holding people accountbile for violation of law without exceeding the limits of reasonable punishment and probation and allocate more funds towards community based supervision.

Icebreaker # 2: How would meaningful community engagement between you and the POC feel?

-Name (District): unlisted

Engaging.

-Name (District): unlisted

Community Engagement needs to reflect the community’s desire to eliminate the trauma caused by the existing Probation culture.

-Jacob J. (Youth Justice Coalition)

It sounds like we could go further than that.

-Phal Suk. (Youth4justice.org) phal.suk@youth4justice.org

Engagement should feel like a two-way conversation.

-Darlene Hunt (Coco + NCNW)

Increase trust in the community. We work together to improve in communicating and understanding each other.

-Berklee Donavan (District 2)

Community Engagement is the Probation Department engaging with their clients and community organizations who provide feedback and address the issues to continue to offer the best service.

-Name (District): unlisted

Safe, fair and unbiased. Like a democracy working as it should.

-Name (District): unlisted

Meaningful community engagement between the POC and me would have me feeling updated and included and it would also form community.

-Edson Rufeno (District not listed)

They are engaged in an active conversation and actually care for the youth in the community.

-Name (District): unlisted

A feeling of being heard, being appreciated and a mutually satisfying solution or a commitment to communicating through differences.

-Name (District): unlisted

Meaningful engagement would be through more community dialogues such as the one tonight, community based research agencies and with youth and adults in the probation system. Engagement with not just community leaders but also youth and adults served by those organizations and programs.

-Elizabeth Lopez (District 1)

A space for dialogue, empathetic process, responsive, equitable – equity promoting approaches.

-Name (District): unlisted

Willing to listen. Not afraid of disagreement. This can bring change if able to strategize task through solution.

-Name (District): unlisted

I feel the engagement work beng fulfilling for the POC, The Hurt Help Group, and the clients of POC t cut down the recidivision rate.

-Olivia Mitchell (District #2)

Quarterly Saturday/Sunday meetings. Bi-Monthly evening meetings. Monthly daytime meetings. Reports of success. Positive life chances. Education, jobs and housing.

-Robert Crain, District: unlisted

Empathetic communication

-Name (District): unlisted

Members of the POC to be members of the community that are system-impacted and have experience with probation. POC to treat community members as the true experts and not act like absolute authority. Complaints to be taken seriously and not just brushed off.

-Phillip Lester (ARC) District: Unlisted

Open and neutral.

Community Engagement/Transparency:

Q1: What kind of community engagement gives everyday residents and stakeholders the power to address issues impacting Departmental policy/practice or the impacts of those policies/practices on the community?

-Vernita Johnson (District 2)

Informative, educational, be able to inform your neighbors about Probation Reform.

-Name Unlisted, (District 3)

Real membership of impacted community members on the commission with real powers of investigation, budget and policy shaping and accountability mechanisms.

-Coach Ron (District): unlisted

That we have open meetings in the community.

-Cam’Ron, George (YJC) District 2

We should pass for more positive activities. We should talk one on one to our PO and they should get where we come from.

-(A New Way of Life) District: Unlisted

-Timing, location of meeting? Census

-How will the public be informed? Canvassing, TV, Social Media, Word of Mouth.

-What do the meetings look like? Social event

-For people who can’t make it, how can their voices be heard?

-Can they turn in comments?

-Need large space to accommodate ALL of the community.

Another avenue to contact the department to make a complaint is to have a panel of people to answer, possibly like the POC could answer certain levels of complaintsand through the Brown Act hold a community meeting to address.

Accessibility.

-Selena from All Of Us Or None (District 4)

Community meetings, a way to have everyone speak their mind. A large platform where everyone has a chance to develop into a community leader. Input and output from the community and timely access to ideas from youth advisory board/something for the youth.

-Name: Unlisted (District 2)

Utilize existing community centers to inform community of policy/practices information (i.e. women of Watts, Watts healthcare center). Build out their capacity by establishing a partnership with the department.

-Name: Unlisted (District 2)

-Provide materials with plenty of time and in an accessible language as well as multiple languages. Use video, media, etc…

-Don’t come to meetings with decision already made, and be transparent about decision making processes

-Lots of accessible information about the budget and evaluation of programs as well as comparison to what is and what is not being invested in.

-Transparency about pretirial decision making if applicable.

-Phillip Lester (ARC) District: Unlisted

Community members who are qualified should be considered to be members of the community that their interest is at hand/that you are directly involved.

 

Q2: What kind of principles, practices, or values does the POC need to embrace to ensure robust community engagement is more than a list of recommendations and actual mission of the POC? Think: collaboration, process, transparency, accessibility, etc…

-Vernita Johnson (District 2)

Phone calls, neighborhood block checks

-Coach Ron (District): unlisted

To go on walking tour of the homeless encampments and world famous Skid Row.

-Name Unlisted, (District 3)

POC needs dedicated spaces and conducts for substantive community input and leadership on policies. POC must also be responsive to and accountable to community input and it must hold the department to these same standards.

-Cam’Ron, George (YJC)

Having more access with their money. They should treat us equally instead of just trying to drug test us and see what we have in us.

-A New Way of Life, District: unlisted

Principle – empathy, trustworthiness, honesty, integrity, accessibility commitment to listening to new ideas.

Practices – more networking, being thoughtful of all the needs of the community, making sure they are hearing from diverse voices. Accessibility.

Values – honesty, value the opinions of all those heard and unable to be heard directly (example: children)

-Name, District: unlisted

Groups like SCYEA

-Name: Unlisted (District 2)

Strong community relations

Practices: go into the community to hear the concerns of residents/youth, allow for those residents to also identify the solution to address the problem.

Principle: Ensure that there is proper representation of members in the POC that are former/current probationers and family members.

-Name: Unlisted (District 2)

-Recognize historic harm.

-Principles, practices, values – understand trauma and substance abuse

-Transparent processes

-Accessible materials

-Keep impacted people at center of solutions.

Practices: Give POC meaningful power

-Diverse community representation with impacted people

Values: Community- a commitment to understanding that a truly safe community will have a significantly smaller Probation department.

-Phillip Lester (ARC) District: Unlisted

The community members voice should be the primary consideration and position

Mission Statement:

Q3: What do better outcomes for juveniles mean to you?

Think: Education outcomes/standards, services and supports, etc…

-Name (District): unlisted

Allowing opportunities for offenders to obtain jobs and housing. A network that helps bridge the gap.

-Name (District): unlisted

Stop using terms such as “Offenders” and “Juveniles” when county officials refer to young people convicted of crimes. We must reduce not only the physical but also the psychological barriers to reintegration. Juvenile is a correctional term.

-Name Unlisted, (District 3)

Reducing/ending juvenile contact. Reducing disparate social impact.

-Cam’Ron, George (YJC) District 2

I would like it if juveniles get more activities like fostering jobs and resources. I want to succeed in life. Constructing a youth center.

-Alfred McCurchin, (District 8)

To deal with every youth on the principle of a human being and not on the basis of color.

-A New Way of Life, District: unlisted

-More education opportunities

-Counseling, one on one therapy

-More recreational opportunities

-Mentor programs

-Community outreach programs

-Job readiness

-Substance abuse counseling

-Homelessness issue addressed

-What is being done to insure a healthy transition back into society after incarceration.

-Placement close to family

-Name: Unlisted (District 2)

-Staying with their families when it’s a healthy environment.

-Education that adequately prepares youth for college and meaningful career.

-Addressing trauma that leads to crime/violence

-Youth can connect with healthy activities like music, arts and sports.

-Job development with access to transportation

-Phillip Lester (ARC) District: Unlisted

Reform: Education, opportunity for meaningful and gainful employment. Juveniles should not be criminalized and punished extremely harshly for infractions of the law. Juveniles should be considered and treated like juveniles as opposed to adult and career criminals.

-Supportive, trusted adults and larger communities.

-Schools and teachers that care and challenge with real critical learning to take place.

-Opportunities for fun and the chance to be kids without worrying about health and safety of themselves and loved ones.

-Rehabilitative programs that treat the whole and get to the root when problems do arise.

-NOT being separated from families and communities.

-NO isolation.

Q4: What do better outcomes for adults mean to you?

Think: Work opportunities, training, education/advanced education, etc…

-Name Unlisted, (District 3)

Reducing/ending adult contact. Reducing disparate social impact.

-Cam’Ron, George (YJC) District 2

Adults want jobs. They want to come out of jail and change their life.

-A New Way of Life, District: unlisted

-Having access to services

-Counseling

-Better standards on probation and parole

-Shouldn’t be able to be violated for petty things

-Address the homelessness issue

-What is being done to ensure a healthy transition back into society after incarceration?

-Address mental health issues

-Counseling and therapy

-Substance abuse issues

-Name: Unlisted (District 2)

Health (Physical and mental), economic stability, healthy housing, career education, addiction treatment

-Phillip Lester (ARC) District: Unlisted

Adults: Reentry is key! At the reentry level adults need social support, counseling, employment work shops and career building guides.

Q5: What does the Probation Oversight Commission need to monitor the Probation Department?

-Vernita Johnson (District 2)

Increase accountability and transparency

-Prioritize minimizing system contact

-Address racial and ethnic disparities

-Prioritize community based supervision and avoiding incarceration.

-Replace need for budget transparency and accountability and policy setting and engagement

-Specifically address public engagement and mandate it to be robust

-Specifically address role of investigatory power.

-State POC’s role in holding department accountable to its mission and vision once developed.

-Name Unlisted, (District 3)

Subpoena power to compel document and data productions must live with POC. POC must be able to direct investigations and inspect facilities unannounced. POC must have budget oversight and share source allocations powers. POC must have more than “Advisory” power over policies.

-Name Unlisted, (District 3)

POC has a duty to translate the Probation budget into understandable digested formats. Reports that can trust spending. The duty should be to report the number of people incarcerated, training, stray dogs vs youth development as well as other departments. Define real measurable goals. What are the consequences when goals aren’t met? Can the POC help drive real-time solutions?

-Alfred McCurchin, (District 8)

To adopt policies to the changing needs of the community.

-Name: Unlisted, (District 2)

Please make sure community is involved to help with the process, also put some community members on the board to help with regulations.

-A New Way of Life, District: unlisted

-The POC should better inform the public of what is being monitored by them over the Probation Department.

-Should give it enough resources to do its job.

-Name: Unlisted (District 2)

-Subpoena power – regular reporting on budget, outcomes, with an eye to evidence based practices and addressing equity.

-Access to positive examples from other places.

-A mandate to include impacted people, with support for their meaningful participation.

-Phillip Lester (ARC) District: Unlisted

Resources and community involvement at every level. The community should not be represented in the absence of community members. Community engagement focus should be to keep the community in the loop of all issues and decisions.

Q6: What must change?

Think: Training, resource needs, outcomes, family voice and choice in service delivery, etc…

-Vernita Johnson (District 2)

Hear our voices. Keep us informed on how juveniles and adults. Motivate, help and support.

-Name unlisted (District 8)

Probation Department must make sure that Probation Officers take time to listen to clients and understand their situation and the reason why a client was incarcerated. Officers need more training.

-Alfred McCurchin, (District 8)

New hiring practices. Hire probation officers who really care about the youth, knowing that the youth are the leaders of tomorrow.

-Name: Unlisted, (District 2)

Inclusion, inclusion, inclusion!

-A New Way of Life, District: unlisted

-Everyone holding a seat must be equally committed to doing the job.

-The head of Probation should be elected.

-POC members should be elected.

-Mutual respect.

-Selena from All Of Us Or None (District 4)

The ways or laws that doesn’t allow system impacted people on the commission.

-Name: Unlisted (District 2)

-Meaningful/Independent complain process.

-Accountibility if abuse in activities occur

-More money to services and less to probation. Reduce the size and scope of the department.

Icebreaker:

Icebreaker # 1: What does public accountability and transparency mean to you?

-Mark Ridley Thomas (District 2)

The persons who read the recommendations need to be transparent when getting those requests and finalize time for response.

-Berklee Donavan (District 2)

Values of honesty, transparency, trust, integrity. Collaboration with the justice – involved community (including the probationers and youth). The community’s voice should be treated as the experts.

-Name: Kim McGill Youth Justice Coalition, District: 2

Public Accountability:

-Input, review and recommendations to BOS of probation policy and budget.

-Subpoena power, independent counsel for the POC.

-POC can close facilities as needed.

-POC creates and administers complain process. Disband OMBUDS – NAUS office at probation.

Transparency:

-POC has full unannounced access to juvenile halls, camps and probation area office. Able to speak to youth and families.

-Release data monthly on who’s on probation- field and facilities.

-Chief selected with community input and job description.

-SB 1421

-Name: Unlisted, District: 2

POC to ensure public access to information and engage the community including hosting town halls and forums. Provide a forum for submission of complaints by residents and stakeholders.

-Name: Unlisted, (District 4)

Transparency should include language that is easy to understand and the thing that the last young lady said should be implemented. She really knows how transparency works and what it looks like in terms of administrators, revising and budgeting, accountability of probation officers as well as young people being involved and listened to.

-Billy Houth (District 27th) representing ARC & API RISE

Public accountability and transparency means that everyone is responsible and has to be honest about issues that we (the public) encounter on a daily basis, whether the issues are homelessness, or lack of medical care for all. We must come together to address these issues in a meaningful way to find solutions together.

-Darlene Hunt (Coco & NCNW) District: Unlisted

To serve the public by providing open and effective transparency to the public. Restoring public trust and morals.

Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

Public accountability to me means being a part of and engaging in Town Hall meetings as a county and specifically the one that I live in. So it is fairly important to me that Vocational Rehabilitation be in practice. Transparency about the funds that are being spent correctly. The Brown Act.

-Name: Nestor Valle, District: Unlisted

My concern with accountability and transparency is that perhaps within this POC there will be room created or left for a type of advocate for the individual on probation address their issues or concerns not as part of an appeals officer but to an advocate to help address those said issues of accountability and transparency.

-Name: Da’Ron George, District: Unlisted

I feel that probation officers engage their clients as criminals of the law instead of people of society and it’s hard for our young people to change their lives if we are portrayed as a criminal. I believe that a higher being needs to change the way Probation Officers interact with their clients. Another thing is the community needs to know fully about what is going on with camps, placements etc…They make young people do community service programs instead of talking to that person to see what went wrong.

-Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

Accountability and transparency is both looking backwards and forwards, meaning being held responsible for transgressions and gaps in the past, much of which is described in the 2015 local audit reports and working openly and collaboratively on compliance and reform going forward. It has to involve community engagement.

-Name: Unlisted, District: 43rd

Public accountability means being held accountable for providing meaningful opportunities to all probationers for life skills, work skills development and workforce entry with equitable wages.

Meaningful community engagement feels like I’m being heard.

Icebreaker # 2: How would meaningful community engagement between you and the POC feel?

-Berklee Donavan (District 2)

Having meetings available to the public (not only in downtown) in various communities and Districts.

Formal surveys for evaluation of the POC, policies and practices presented at community meetings. Maybe in paper or online for the community to submit their feedback in a formal manner.

A membership program for the POC to ensure that it holds members of the community.

-Name: Unlisted, District: 2

-Voting members that reflect the impacted community

-broad access to information and data by the public.

-Institutionalized mechanisms to vet and get required approval of the budget and policies by the public.

-Accessible, formal process for investigation and resolution.

-Mandated response to community complaints.

-Name: Unlisted, (District 4)

Robust community to host regular periodic gatherings in locations and at times when community stakeholders can attend. Translators, etc…make them part of the commissions. All commission and sub commissions will provide true transparency. Legal organizations around this issue need to see if there is a mandate. The community needs to be engaged in all meetings, sub-committee meetings and the info should be available in written form. This should not just be probation making decisions, new people create new models that work.

The commission needs to be formed by people who are currently and formerly probationers. They need to be a part of the Commission. People on the commission need to know what they are talking about from the inside out, not just from the outside looking in.

-Billy Houth (District 27th) representing ARC & API RISE

I encourage that issues will be addressed in a meaningful way and work with the public to build a community where we all can feel safe and protect our youth instead of sending them behind bars.

-Name: Unlisted, District: 43rd

Meaningful community engagement feels like I’m being heard and an honest, empathetic conversation ensues until a reasonable solution to my concern is reached.

Community Engagement/Transparency:

Q1: What kind of community engagement gives everyday residents and stakeholders the power to address issues impacting Departmental policy/practice or the impacts of those policies/practices on the community?

-Name: Unlisted (District 1)

-Challenging the idea of engagement and moving towards shared power, so perhaps placing a resident or community member on the commission.

-Holding more community dialogues like the one tonight.

-Transparency in budget and budget decisions.

-Making a portion of youth development and job training to reduce recidivism for youth who continue to fall into the probation system.

-Name: Unlisted (District 1)

-Meeting people where they are at, recognizing how far people have come/history/lived experiences as it relates to the system.

-Ensuring that addressing issues that impact are centered around impacts of such departments on community , working from here to move forward , to include movements toward economic development, uplifting, jobs, career development.

-Approaches and training – humanizing certain roles (stakeholders like law enforcement) and ensuring they properly approach the public and listen.

-Name: Unlisted, District: 1

-Include Current/Former probationers/Detainees and family members on the POC.

-Require public engagement and input before POC approval of department policy and budget proposals.

-Require department to respond to POC requests/recommendations as well as to provide data and information (Enforceable with a subpoena for Documents and testimony) at public hearings.

-Phal Suk, District: 2  (phal.suk@youth4justice.rog)

-The commission should hold meetings within the community in varying geographic locations including the outskirts of the county such as Palmdale/Lancaster.

-The meetings should be held during more accessible hours or days so families and working parents can attend.

-The agenda should be open to the community to develop, not only to take input but from it.

-Complaints should be taken at hearings/town halls, in written form, i.e. complaints against staff.

-Name: Ms. Webb (Coco), District: 2

Walking through our neighborhood and talking with our neighbors about their needs and seeing how we can help each other, but also with the help of community centers like Community Coalition, GRYD, Brotherhood Crusie. They help give us information on some things.

-Name: Unlisted, District: Council District 8, Super District 2

Frequent engagements. Allow for venting.

-Selena Lopez: (District 4)

Open meetings. Training resident of the language that is used. Inform the public of the agenda and where the meetings are being held.

-Darlene Hunt (Coco & NCNW) District: Unlisted

POC come out to the community to meet with us. Have two citizens in the community as part of the POC.

-Billy Houth (District 27th) representing ARC & API RISE

Allow both parties to hold public meetings and address issues together. Investigate all complaints against law enforcement.

-Name and District: Unlisted

The community needs to build a mutual trust. This includes, but is not limited to community update meetings, stakeholder engagement in community events, schoolboard meetings and city council attendants. Involvement in local organization fundraiser is also a way to positively engage, familiarize and consult with community members. Foster community relationship building as well as transparency on budgeting items.

-Name: Community Coalition, District: Unlisted

-Open community conversation/communication

-Timely access to correct information

-Community votes/say so

-Community recommendation

-Youth engagement/Advisory board with youth.

-Name: Dominique Davis (All Of Us Or None), District: Unlisted

The Brown Act has been a law since 1953, but there are ad hawk sub-committee hearings that are not mandated to be made public. Without other representatives from communities where issues are impacted, the most or entire groups of people from the impacted communities, there will be no REAL power.

-Name: Unlisted, from (All Of Us Or None), District: Unlisted

Value the everyday life of the community. Not everyone is politically inclined. Develop the practice of mandating effective communication to the general public of all meetings “General and special” at a time significantly above the minimum time frame of notice.

-Zahria T. (YJC) District: Unlisted

Having structure in the community. I feel that it would be a little bit better if a probation officer actually tries to understand the youth instead of just keeping track on the students checking in or drug testing them. Actually finding out what the issues are. Look at the community that they are around. Be supportive.

-Name and District: Unlisted

Create and publish a client focused, forward thinking Mission, Vision and Values statement to be a living document rooted in the day to day operations of the Oversight. The Oversight is responsible to be a vehicle to engage the community, monitor reform efforts and drive better outcomes for youth and adults.

-Name and District: Unlisted

-A process to report incidences to third party community advocates and residents.

-Random check-ins from advocates in P.O. offices/case plans. Slow and steady evaluation to get it. Restorative round tables with POC, Probation Dept. and community, less Ivory Tower meetings and come down into the community.

-Name and District: Unlisted

We Are One as a Group is designed to approach community engagement that includes but is not limited to town hall meetings and community, forums, to fulfill the POC’s mandate to achieve, transparency, involve young people in the dialogue. Must have subpoena and investigation, powers to arrive at the truth of complaints and system issues. Have a sample of 90 days.

-Name: Emily Blake (Smart Justice Manager, LA Area Chamber & Member of Community Coalition), District: South LA

Create process to involve community members in implementation and decision making to strengthen work and population level changes.

-Name: Unlisted, District: 43rd

-Regular meetings, Justice more consistent

-Get to know each other better when it’s more consistent.

-Currently meets two times per month during the middle of the day.

-We could do these meetings in our communities.

-Can have more community members be part of the committees.

-More frequent and more accessible.

-Decision making process.

-Document what they are doing for the community.

-Intimate conversations that need to be had as well as a venting process. Honest empathetic conversation.

-Involving the community into the system.

Mother speaks from South LA…58 years talked about the cost of having her sons incarcerated far away, money spent sending them things, police brutality. There needs to be communication by way of departments.

Q2: What kind of principles, practices, or values does the POC need to embrace to ensure robust community engagement is more than a list of recommendations and actual mission of the POC? Think: collaboration, process, transparency, accessibility, etc…

-Name: Unlisted (District 1)

Moving away from community engagement towards shared power and allowing a position for a community member or stakeholder to actively be involved in the process as well as continued transparency. Not just one or a handful of meetings, but continued engagement even once the POC is established.

More trauma informed care.

-Name: Unlisted (District 1)

-Reporting back on process, progress, identified outcomes.

-Collaborative, open, mindful, incorporating the future well-being, successful, thriving communities.

-Values, honesty, respectful, balanced, humanizing, dignity, integrity, safe.

-Use forward thinking, cost effective systems of info sharing communications.

-Name: Unlisted, District: 1

-Reflect community including those directly impacted in POC and in Public Engagement

-Facilitate deep and meaningful engagement with the community (including in camps and halls across the county)

-Make information and data publicly available in ways that the community can access, consider and engage.

-Staff community engagement through partnerships with local community-based organizations and system-impacted people.

-Name: Unlisted (District 2)

There should be a youth advisory board, an advisory board/committee made up of those returning to the community.

Advanced notice of meetings and widespread sharing of the agenda.

Conduct more listening sessions.

Send notices to community based org.

-Olivia (District 2)

POC members to have lived experience, relatable, sympathy, empathy. A prison for rehabilitation and a focus on rehab.

-Name: Unlisted, District: 2

-Those most impacted have expertise on solutions.

-Collaboration is key to transparency and accountability within the community.

-Probation system contact has been disproportionately impacting communities of color and engagement should address that inequity.

-Phal Suk, District: 2  (phal.suk@youth4justice.rog)

-The POC should understand that it represents the community and it works for the community.

-If the POC may disagree with the community, it should not dismiss the idea.

-The POC should engage in dialogue and not only take comments but also have open conversations with commenters and the public.

-The POC should see itself as a resource for the community, not law enforcement or the government.

-Name: Ms. Webb (Coco), District: 2

They need to listen more and be more patient with the people, because some of them do not understand what is being passed down.

-Name: Unlisted, District: Council District 8, Super District 2

Frequent engagements. Allow for venting.

-Selena Lopez: (District 4)

Investment in people having a community point based first. Focus more so on community.

-Name: Unlisted, (District 4)

The POC needs to embrace value and the principle that seeing the job from non-probation officials, non- law enforcement officers but community groups of people who have gone through the legal system from the inside who will give a unique perspective to make sure that values and practices are just and fair. Extend the minimum notice of meetings to a longer period than 72 hours if you value participation by the community to participate in all parts of the reform process.

-Darlene Hunt (Coco & NCNW) District: Unlisted

To achieve successful collaboration with the community. All parties involved need to strive to understand the point of view of all. Religion, community organization, etc… Strategic planning is always good.

-Billy Houth (District 27th) representing ARC & API RISE

Make sure all complaints are thoroughly investigated against public officials and law enforcement. Listen to the concerns of the public to address issues.

-Name and District: Unlisted

The POC needs to recognize the historical context of policing relations/law enforcement relations. Once this is truly understood, a trauma informed approach to community policing can be formulated. There needs to be an authentic relationship that knows what it means to nurture community values of honesty, respect and protection. Impacted people need to be at the center of solutions.

-Name: Community Coalition, District: Unlisted

-Having Youth Advisory

-More youth groups like SEYEA at Community Coalition

-Name: Dominique Davis (All Of Us Or None), District: Unlisted

Principle of honesty, openness, whole hearted communication, engagement directly with the community to ensure the desired output which according to the current mission of rehabilitation and produce a functional member of society.

-Name: Unlisted, from (All Of Us Or None), District: Unlisted

Develop the practice of identifying “Local community orgs” that are organizations advocating on behalf of communities most affected by probation.

-Zahria T. (YJC) District: Unlisted

Engage with the community and more with the youth. Acknowledge the people of the community and be understanding.

-Name: Unlisted, District: 43rd

-Department that is committed to hearing the community’s experiences.

-Needs to have power

-Accept that people can change

-Raise the bar of standard of accountability

-A department that takes into account the difficulties.

-Life experience – putting people who have been in the system in positions.

-Adopt a view that the system should rehabilitate and assist people to get back on their feet.

-Opportunities should be prioritized.

Mission Statement:

Q3: What do better outcomes for juveniles mean to you?

Think: Education outcomes/standards, services and supports, etc…

-Name: Unlisted (District 1)

Youth engagement, early preventative services, trauma informed intervention reentry services, pro-social activities and opportunities. Reducing school to prison pipeline systems by reducing suspensions and expulsions especially at an early age.

-Name: Unlisted (District 1)

Successful, thriving, healthy living and community, positive trajectories defined by juveniles, empowerment, decreased or cease to exist systems of punishment, just practices around safety and promoting safety that is supportive, college graduates, wealth development and services to ensure that, building values together, pipelines to successful careers.

-Name: Unlisted, District: 1

Better outcomes mean addressing themes of minimizing system contact and incorporating prioritization of keeping those under supervision (in the community and working to address racial and ethnic disparities).

-Name: Unlisted, District: 1

Young people are safe, thriving, learning, healthy, striving for ambitious goals expected to succeed and achieving success, part of the families who have the opportunity to remain intact, part of the communities that are clean and resourced. Children are treated as children.

-Name: Kim McGill Youth Justice Coalition, District: 2

1. Every youth in LA has the right to heal, prepare for college and a career, have an affordable place for them and their family to live, walk their streets, the halls of their schools and ride public transportation without being  unnecessarily stopped, searched and labeled as gang members and then added to gang databases. They deserve youth empowerment and the opportunity to live in non-gang injunction zones. All youth deserve access to a job, youth center and intervention worker. This goes for both youth and adults.

-Name: Unlisted (District 2)

Youth are able to read and are mentored or tutored to be able to keep up with school. Youth have access to mental, medical and wellness services. Youth and adults have access to non-profit organizations to connect before they are released.

-Mark Ridley Thomas (District 2)

Education, income and good advice not quick to violate probationers.

-Berklee Donavan (District 2)

EVIDENCE –BASED PRACTICES!

Example: cognitive behavioral therapy, life skills classes, Anger Management

-Educational Support

-Job Training

-Individual Therapy

-Family Reunification

-Mentorship Programs

-Substance abuse treatment

-Trauma informed care

*Less focus on incarceration and more on rehabilitative programming.

-Olivia (District 2)

High School Graduation for juveniles. Prevention, Intervention and Reentry.

-Name: Lupita (Youth 4 Justice), District: 2

A better outcome to me looks like I know the County would not keep hundreds of schools open if they can’t fill them up with students as much as they used to, so why still keep many juvenile facilities open if the data has been proven that crime has gone down. So I know they are not filling up the facility to CLOSE SOME DOWN.

-Name: Unlisted, District: 2

Involve the young people with more of their own dialogue. You must get to the root of their stress, worries of dealing with independence. Listen to their concerns and have mentors assigned to groups of youth.

-Name: Unlisted, District: 2

It makes me happy to know they now will look to try a better route and it feels good to know that someone cares for them and looks out for them. They may become encouraged to do better.

-Name: Unlisted, District: 2

To make a better person out of them. To maturate them to do something for themselves, let them know that they are somebody and that they can be whatever they want to be.

-Phal Suk, District: 2 (phal.suk@youth4justice.rog)

-Reduced contact with law enforcement, increased diversion.

-Non-law enforcement operated programs in the community.

-Career readiness, higher education preparation.

-Cultural and gender sensitive reports.

-Probation staff without badges and uniforms acting humanely.

-Name: Ms. Webb (Coco), District: 2

Schools designed to help them better themselves. To take the things that they know and help to bring it to life. Part time jobs or training to get them a job. Group meetings for their age group.

-Name: Unlisted, District: Council District 8, Super District 2

Inclusion in terms of being able to impact by contributing to community health.

-Coach Ron (District 4)

Prevention, intervention and Reentry. No more probation. Be authentic. Live in purpose. Parents role.

-Selena Lopez: (District 4)

Better representation. Education that meets with college programs. Better legal advice regarding charges. Stop the use of excessive force. Proper therapy care. More resources that help stop juveniles from going to jail.

-Name: Unlisted, (District 4)

Better outcomes for Juveniles means to inform juveniles of their changes, make sure their defense advocates for them and informs them of their changes. Make sure they are educated and trained so that it prepares them for higher education and their future. Stop use of excessive force (Tear gas, etc…), need staff or trauma and more group homes and to be better supervised.

-Darlene Hunt (Coco & NCNW) District: Unlisted

Implementing Juvenile Reform.

-Billy Houth (District 27th) representing ARC & API RISE

Better outcomes for juveniles means education instead of prison, better health care for all juveniles, equal school system, improve foster care homes, after school programs, gang prevention programs.

-Name and District: Unlisted

Juveniles need more opportunities to succeed. There is always a funding component added to the conversation, however if there were more programs offered for music, sports, therapy, college guidance, there would be less juvenile delinquency. I also firmly believe that parents should have access to more classes and childcare options. Take it back to a village framework.

-Name: Community Coalition, District: Unlisted

-Open community conversation/communication

To me it means that their opinions should be taken into consideration.

-Name: Unlisted, from (All of Us or None), District: Unlisted

Effective Diversion program for youth.

Name: Chris White, District: Unlisted

Better outcomes for Juveniles means providing them with the services they need to become productive citizens in the community and outside the communities.

Name: Jacob Jackson (Youth Justice Coalition), District: Unlisted

Better, education, provide money to resources like youth center for youth after school. Being able to help with jobs and to get more counseling.

Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

More education opportunities and mentorship. More recreation centers in the area. More counseling centers available. Drug and alcohol treatment centers.

-Name: Mandy Maldonado (Youth Justice Coalition), District: Unlisted

Better outcomes for juveniles should focus on school and to do more mindful activities to help them grow and learn from the past mistakes. They should be viewed as equal as their higher ups. Everyone deserves the best and having more positive opportunities for themselves, family, community and friends. It’s only bettering the world. If juveniles have someone to lean on, like a counselor or therapy for a better mindset.

-Name: Da’Ron George, District: Unlisted

Better outcomes for young people are the youth getting more help such as tutoring, a therapist to talk to and other services will help them very much.

-Zahria T. (YJC) District: Unlisted

Making juveniles feel comfortable even though they know the situation that they are in isn’t all that pleasant. Probationers need to hold themselves accountable.

-Name: Unlisted, District: 43rd

-Improve access to job training, entrepreneurial classes

-provide for a system that helps create meaningful options that are better earning.

-Pathways for success

-Careers – trades

-Name: Emily Blake (Smart Justice Manager, LA Chamber Community Coalition Member), District: South LA

Create systemic practices that put youth on pathways for higher education and career development.

Q4: What do better outcomes for adults mean to you?

Think: Work opportunities, training, education/advanced education, etc…

-Name: Unlisted (District 1)

Reentry services. Employment focus, adult education, technical training. Child care and parenting services or classes. Substance abuse treatment.

-Name: Unlisted (District 1)

Addressing lived experiences, efforts to reverse or take steps towards reforming how adults are treated. Opportunities for growth and development.

-Name: Unlisted (District 2)

Youth are able to read and are mentored or tutored to be able to keep up with school. Youth have access to mental, medical and wellness services. Youth and adults have access to non-profit organizations to connect before they are released.

-Mark Ridley Thomas (District 2)

Establish partnerships with the public system wide coordination to support youth/adults that is effective in preventing them. Effective communication and accessibility to family members.

-Berklee Donavan (District 2)

EVIDENCE –BASED PRACTICES!

Example: cognitive behavioral therapy, life skills classes, Anger Management

-Educational Support

-Job Training

-Individual Therapy

-Family Reunification

-Mentorship Programs

-Substance abuse treatment

-Trauma informed care

*Less focus on incarceration and more on rehabilitative programming.

-Prevention efforts within communities and schools.

-Restorative Justice practices.

SIGNIFICANT DRECREASE IN RECIDIVISM RATE!

-Name: Lupita (Youth 4 Justice), District: 2

Adults come out from lockup without driver’s license. Come out with jobs for firefighters or will have trade school in the county.

-Coach Ron (District 4)

Mentorship, JMHSA, Job Training. DARE/Just Say No. Programs in schools.

-Selena Lopez: (District 4)

More diversion programs. More mental care. Resources for when you are about to get out.

-Darlene Hunt (Coco & NCNW) District: Unlisted

Implementing adult reform.

-Name: Unlisted, (District 4)

Better outcomes for adults means they need therapy for mental health issues and not be changed for all this which only makes the cycle repeat. Cut people off of the treadmill. Real services, real care, trained staff, oversight, listen to abuse and don’t be oblivious to the lives of those in the system.

-Billy Houth (District 27th) representing ARC & API RISE

Keep DLR away from reentering programs, programs for employment, medical programs, improve mental health, career training opportunities, programs for higher education. Oversee probation and parole to make sure we have fair treatment.

-Name and District: Unlisted

Adults need community. If there were more educational opportunities, childcare and financial planning.

-Name: Unlisted, from (All of Us or None), District: Unlisted

Effective Diversion program for youth.

Name: Chris White, District: Unlisted

Better outcomes for adults is to provide them with services that allow them to receive restorative services.

Name: Jacob Jackson (Youth Justice Coalition), District: Unlisted

Be able to purchase a spot with support, and track schools in jails, juvenile halls and camps. Another outcome is to be able to go to places that aren’t permitted for adults.

Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

More transitional programs, more mentorship.

-Name: Mandy Maldonado (Youth Justice Coalition), District: Unlisted

Bettering outcomes for adults can be different in every case. Each person should be analyzed differently in situations of laws. My father is doing more than 15 years in prison and is almost out. Someone is this position will not come out to a real world normally. Their mentality is still trapped mixed with physically doing what you want and is possible.

-Name: Kim McGill Youth Justice Coalition, District: 2

Free public transportation, ID’s, birth certificates, Social Security cards, path to citizenship and access to resources. Jobs, treatment, housing, mental health on demand. No fees, no fine, no bail dramatically reduce jail y expanding, improving and speeding up pre-trial release and with that we could stop the jail law. . No jail in Mira Loma, use COH instead for smaller facility.

-Name: Da’Ron George, District: Unlisted

Better outcomes for adults are resources that help them with getting a job so that they could better their circumstance. Because jobs don’t like to hire people with felonies.

-Name: Unlisted, District: 2

Outcomes should include:

-creating employment opportunities, readiness

-reunifying families

-Educational Outcomes (Literacy, GED, etc…)

-Holistic approach to include substance abuse, mental health, housing, cognitive behavior intervention, get people thinking differently.

-Name: Unlisted, District: 2

When they get out of jail, have the evaluated to go into the armed services to see if they can join the army.

-Name: Unlisted, District: 2

Better outcomes for Adults means that adults are worth something and will do a job better to move up.

-Name: Unlisted, District: 2

That they have done something for themselves by making a better life for themselves.

-Phal Suk, District: 2 (phal.suk@youth4justice.rog)

-Self-help programs, transformative justice programs

-Higher education programming inside lockups

-Assistance with expungements

-Assistance with reentry supports through community partnerships without law enforcement.

-Career readiness and job placement with living maps.

-Familial contact maintenance during incarceration.

-Zahria T. (YJC) District: Unlisted

Holding each other accountable. Everyone is human and make everyone feel comfortable. Allow someone to explain themselves instead of judging them for what they have done. Look at the reason why they did it and understand why.

-Name: Ms. Webb (Coco), District: 2

Job training for better jobs, more education so that they don’t feel less than group meetings, help them work on their feelings, medical services for them, Dental work,  because we don’t know how long they have been gone.

-Name: Unlisted, District: Council District 8, Super District 2

Inclusion in terms of being able to impact by contributing to community health.

Q5: What does the Probation Oversight Commission need to monitor the Probation Department?

-Vermuta Johnson Thomas (District 2)

A department that is efficient and accessible to probationers and family.

-Mark Ridley Thomas (District 2)

They need to be inclusive of community. The Probation Dept needs outsiders to be involved to oversee them and not the police policing the police.

-Coach Ron (District 4)

That people with live experience should be a part of the review process. Monitor the Probation Department.

-Berklee Donavan (District 2)

POC must monitor service implementation by probation officers. Must have community members on every level. Expect transparency about specific issues regarding treatment, budget and program implementation.

-Darlene Hunt (Coco & NCNW) District: Unlisted

Access to complete files to conduct work. Must have resources.

-Olivia (District 2)

Lived experience, Diversity. Community oriented and to look at why adults and kids go to probation.

-Billy Houth (District 27th) representing ARC & API RISE

POC needs to hire or employ non-governmental or non-enforcement personnel. Seek out non-law enforcement. Community has to have a say in every level.

-Name & District: Unlisted

Funding!!! Tracking and logs. Expense reports. Input on expenses from community.

-Name: Unlisted (District 1)

A seat for a community member or stakeholder moving away from engagement and towards shared power by replacing community members or measurable outcomes and consequences if they are not met.

-Name: Unlisted (District 1)

POC needs to monitor Probation – mezzo level staff. A community engaged manner of reporting back on outcomes and progress. Implementing a system of oversight that is structured with accountable and transparent elements, realistic goals, ability to assign and request that probation staff aren’t stagnant but held accountable and deliver on tasks and prospects. Tracking $$!

-Selena Lopez: (District 4)

Community orgs. Being watch dog for these meetings.

-Name and District: Unlisted

Subpoena power. There needs to be a clear definition of ethical practices and consequences for unethical behavior.

-Name: Unlisted, District: 1

The power to hold public hearings and subpoena documents and testimony from this department and make recommendations about policy practice and budget changes and ensure transparency and accountability (Including by exercising independent investigatory power). These should meet and exceed the powers specified in WIC-0-229-230.

-Name: Unlisted, (District 4)

The Probation Oversight Commission needs the time to make just and thoughtful decisions. The Oversight needs to continue with members of the commission having people from the community and people formerly on probation on the commission. They need to have the authority to remove ineffective unqualified Probation Department officers. Make sure Probation Department has people who know something.

-Name: Dominique Davis (All Of Us Or None), District: Unlisted

-Community organizers from impacted community as watchdogs in their community.

-Allowing people who are impacted by the system to serving on the POC.

-People who live in the county in which they are commissioning.

-Actual probation officers on the POC.

-Name: Unlisted, from (All Of Us Or None), District: Unlisted

The types of training and actions taken by the Probation Department relating to the implementation or enforcement of current and advised policies.

Name: Chris White, District: Unlisted

Investigative body that requires full disclosure with input from community based organizations.

Name: Jacob Jackson (Youth Justice Coalition), District: Unlisted

They should monitor how they treat the youth. They should also watch the hiring process.

Name: Unlisted, District: 2

Legal authority to inspection, fines and punishment.

-Name: Mandy Maldonado (Youth Justice Coalition), District: Unlisted

Each person and case is two completely different concepts. They need to monitor each case and person with love and care. No entitlement or discouragement. Focus more to community, work and school.

-Name: Nestor Valle, District: Unlisted

To create a position to address these concerns with probation department. How the advice given from POC will or will not be implemented. Perhaps creating a specific timeframe in which to answer these issues.

-Name: Unlisted, District: 1

Real Power. Adequate resources. Live data and quality research. Probation transparency. The ability to develop creative solutions when there is probation.

-Name: Da’Ron George, District: Unlisted

I think the commission should send the Probation officers into re-training class to see how to better handle the youth.

-Name: Unlisted, District: 2

-Oversight should be fair, equitable, diverse, commission should self-regulate.

-POC needs to have a key understanding of the functions within the department and have power to go into the department without an agenda. Goal is to create positive change and should strive to be a partner of the Probation Department.

-Needs to be a diverse group of people – educational, people from the system, law enforcement and others.

-Name: Unlisted, District: 2

They need to monitor recorded meetings and changes made within the probation department.

-Name: Unlisted, District: 2

They need to get a team of three people to come in and monitor once a month. They should have an outline of what they have come to inspect at the Probation Department and the Probation office. They need to tell them about the services that they offer their clients. Give them mental health services and housing.

-Name: Unlisted, District: 2

Oversight Commission needs to take time to examine what’s going on and create a plan that will work to monitor probation acts. Set a plan a make sure that it is followed. Take authority over the data. Insist that offices follow their plan. Plan their work and then work their plan. Check on Probation to see if they are following all of the rules. You must change what you are doing to another plan.

-Name: Unlisted, District: 2

Oversight Commission needs to be aware of what’s going on in and out of the community and the people that are supposed to monitor the outcomes of every situation that comes up in the community. The department should be careful in evaluating how to handle problems that the people are concerned about.

-Phal Suk, District: 2 (phal.suk@youth4justice.rog)

-Expenditures, spending

-Hiring, processes and denials of employment

-Staff and complaints against them.

-Facilities through unannounced visits

-Clearance denials for volunteers.

-Zahria T. (YJC) District: Unlisted

The Probation Department may need community monitoring and systemic reform.

-Name: Ms. Webb (Coco), District: 2

More classes in regards to what kinds of changes they would like to see put into place, stop overloading them with so many cases, and if needed hire more people.

-Name: Unlisted, District: Council District 8, Super District 2

The POC shall provide best supervision and rehab services designed to enhance the probationers’ potential to contribute positive efforts towards creating and sustaining healthy communities.

-Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

Tools (Cameras, technology) and resources (money). Authority to include access to information and data, monitor spending, access to records, subpoena power, ability to talk and communicate with other departments.

-Name: Emily Blake (Smart Justice Manager, LA Chamber Community Coalition Member), District: South LA

Ensure more spending and funds go toward what we want in our communities – investing in youth and adults returning home.

Q6: What must change?

Think: Training, resource needs, outcomes, family voice and choice in service delivery, etc…

-Vermuta Johnson Thomas (District 2)

Partner with local nonprofits to house youth without removing them from the community.

-Mark Ridley Thomas (District 2)

They need to come to the people community to have a voice in what is said or done to make the system run smoother. Work better and help the majority.

-Coach Ron (District 4)

Deal with people as human beings not based on color. Support network within communities. Recruit different standards, community organist, the people that hired.

-Berklee Donavan (District 2)

-Trauma informed probation officers

-Evidence-based practices used by probation when interacting with clients

-Family and probation voice heard

-Darlene Hunt (Coco & NCNW) District: Unlisted

The abuse to the people in the probation system.

-Olivia (District 2)

No more compensation and incentive. Educating the community.

-Billy Houth (District 27th) representing ARC & API RISE

Allow public to have a say in the appointment of probation officers. Allow public to have access to probation personnel‘s history of employment.

-Name & District: Unlisted

Programs implied rather than incarceration. Providing a forum from community resident.

-Name: Unlisted (District 1)

Funding in schools!!!!!!! Especially schools that have a high percentage of students falling into probation. Ending high suspension and expulsion rates and the school to prison pipeline is abolished and being on probation stops being the norm in underfunded, low-resourced communities and schools. Ending recidivism on probation.

-Name: Unlisted (District 1)

Training, lens, mindset, focused on futures. Youth and family voice in rebuilding process.

-Selena Lopez: (District 4)

Everything. Transparency. Resources that are in place but that aren’t working.

-Name and District: Unlisted

There must be an understanding of social histories of offenders. There also needs to be an integration of evidence-based probationary practices. This includes, but is not limited to necessary use of force, trauma informed interactions, verbal de-escalation.

-Name: Community Coalition, District: Unlisted

The whole system needs to change their negative views of criminals. If you steel a basic necessity then resources should be given. “If you shape the future they should be able to make and be included in decisions”.

-Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

Everyone should get a second chance depending on the crime you commit. Stealing food, clothes or water should not be decided by giving jail time or putting it on your permanent record. At the end of the day it was done for a reason and you can never tell what the person is going through. Everyone should have the same change.

-Name: Dominique Davis (All Of Us Or None), District: Unlisted

Mission Statement of POC ideas:

-Advise the Board of Probation in ways to best serve the community in producing reformed citizens who are an asset to not only their community but to the world.

-Name: Unlisted, from (All of Us or None), District: Unlisted

Mission: To foster greater local community self-advocacy and determination through specific oversight of Probation Operational Policy. Secure identifiable reforms from local community and advocate reforms that affect their immediate communities and impact the broader communities including those within county and state justice facilities under the Department’s supervision. Improve transparency and public accountability of the department.

Name: Chris White, District: Unlisted

Mission Statement: We the Oversight Committee are committed to serving our Juvenile and Adult community by providing proper oversight and responsibility to our clients and our community.

No more of same old, same old. Must have community involvement. Be committed to community involvement.

Name: Jacob Jackson (Youth Justice Coalition), District: Unlisted

The way that the officers are trained to handle the youth. They need to change their interaction with the youth. Being able to listen to the youth and family stories or how they are affected.

Name: Unlisted, District: 6

Recruitment. Training at all levels on services available and train community agencies.

-Name: Mandy Maldonado (Youth Justice Coalition), District: Unlisted

Change should take place with laws first. Better mindset, we are all one. Protect and serve with more love and care. Training.

-Name: Nestor Valle, District: Unlisted

More of an attempt to engage families of probationers. As the old saying goes “It takes a village”. Again make available programs to foster success. Specifically more education. Perhaps for adults making attending a trade tech or community college course a requirement.

-Name: Unlisted, District: 1

The will to make the changes, not just the mechanisms. The probation department needs to actually be held accountable by this body. There needs to be measurable markers and consequences if they are not met like any functioning business.

-Name: Unlisted, District: 2

The people have a voice and should be heard. Listen and communicate with people so they can come together. Mission Statement: Finalize a timeline at least within 90 days with an answer.

-Phal Suk, District: 2 (phal.suk@youth4justice.rog)

-How probation staff is trained.

-They should not act as law enforcement

-The department needs to be downsized.

-The department’s mission should return to the historical inception of supports, not suppression.

-The department should not collaborate with other LEAs, including ICE.

-Name and District: Unlisted

Probation officers must be educated to cultural differences so judges won’t get reports that stereotype juveniles and adults who are going before court are falsely portrayed which destroys lives.

-Zahria T. (YJC) District: Unlisted

Everything! How people are being treated and how the police department responds to the meeting or treats the community after a tragic incident.

-Name: Unlisted, District: Council District 8, Super District 2

The relationship between the public and the probation department.

-Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

Mission Statement List:

-Needs to include the voices of people who have been impacted.

-Minimizing systems contacting, making Diversion and treatment central.

-Strive to achieve accessibilities

-Board will remain accountable and responsive to the communities

-Investigative power/subpoena power.

The Mission of the POC is ________

Its responsibility is to ____________

Because in order to ______________

We commit to __________________

In order to _____________________

-Name: Emily Blake (Smart Justice Manager, LA Area Chamber & Member of Community Coalition), District: South LA

Create cross sector collaborative of stakeholders with collective responsibility for justice outcomes. End system of fear, oppression harming communities and establish system of love, support, connection to community results/population level change. Leverage collective impact framework for sustainable systemic change.

-Name:K Alicie (Community Coalition), District: Unlisted

People with high self-esteem that know how to work with kids to make sure they don’t go back to the system which is bad for the community.

October 17, 2018, Probation Organizational Structure Mission Vision Values

Mission & Org Structure

Q1: How can the Probation Department’s services be structured to best respond to the needs of the community?

-Name: Phal Sok (Youth 4 Justice), District: 2

Probation should be trained by community members, especially by people formerly incarcerated.

Reform is not the key, culture competence and culture shift is.

The department should be downsized and hands-on services should be provided by community based and owned organizations that do not use punitive language. Organizations should not pathologize people.

Independent suggestion and complaint process should not be handled by probation.

There should be the ability as an independent entity to have full unannounced access to facilities.

Divert and release mechanisms at all levels.

Do not hire former military or law enforcement.

Positive performance evaluations for successful non-lockup cases.

-Name: Bruce Patton, District: 2

They can best serve by structuring themselves as the probationer’s social service, mental health and education advocates.

Develop an understanding of the culture in the community. Understanding the culture in a probationer’s home is extremely important.

It must be stated that we resident of the LA County communities did not raise our children to be prison population and coco wage workers.

Trying to get probationers to trust PO’s. If trust is gained then are there limited avenues that the PO’s can take to develop a probationer’s abilities to compete.

-Name: Kim McGill (Youth Justice Coalition), zip code 90059 District: 2

1. Separate (move custody, confinement and supervision) youth up to age 25 to County Youth Development & Diversion Department to be non-criminalizing (Criminogenic needs. Punitive, isolating) to be strengths based, owned/operated/partnered with youth, families and communities.

2. 75% of Probation budget goes to youth custody and supervision even though many more adults are on Probation. Shift 75% to adults to ensure larger, more responsive pre-arraignment assessment and release (within 4 hours) rather than pre-trial release in order to divert thousands of people out of jails, prevent jail expansion and eliminate fees, fines and bail that drains money from low income and working class families.

3. Mandate closing of all county lockups. Immediately close at least one juvenile hall. , half the beds at the other halls and half of the probation camps and engage in a community visioning and application process about how to repurpose that land.

4. Redirect money to youth and community development. Start with cutting 5% of Probation (and other law enforcement budgets) in order to create a safer county and stronger youth and families. Between 2007 and 2016/17 when crime dropped more than 50% (to lowest levels since the 1950s and 1960s) and populations in juvenile halls and camps dropped by more than half, Probation’s budget went up by 450 million, Sherriff’s by 1 Billion and LA Police Department by $900 Million.

-Name: Unlisted District: 2

Structure the case load based on needs instead of risk. Include complete transparency around data collecting, specifically what data is used to assess risk and need.

-Name: Unlisted District: Unlisted

By fostering a strong commitment to collaborating with all other county departments with community input.

Services must be structured to interconnect with other LA County Departments. The needs of the community are reflected in the many categories of essential support for a thriving, sustainable community: housing, employment, education, health, arts, and community-based law enforcement.

The Cultural Equity and Inclusion Initiative should be established as a cornerstone to ensure quality of access to resources.

-Name: Unlisted District: Unlisted

Change the requirements for people to volunteer or work with system involved individuals. Get rid of the background checks. Do this for CBO’s who receive money from the Probation Department. Former system involved people should be able to work with them.

-Name: Unlisted District: Unlisted

I feel the Probation Department’s services can be structured best to fit the needs of the community by actually having those people of the community sit in meetings and say what they’re going through and what is needed.

-Name: Unlisted District: Unlisted

The resources they have should be allocated towards housing, clothes, food and connection to community programs before and instead of court, violations and incarceration. The structure provides for way too much authority of individual officers to the extent that outcomes are related to the bias of individuals and a department whose primary infrastructure is to punish youth when they make normal adolescent mistakes.

-Name: Unlisted, zip code 90731 District: Unlisted

Don’t structure it like a business. Integrate more community. Bring more community members to the table. Officer, you are a public servant funded by tax payers. DO NOT position yourself higher than the public. YOU REPRESENT US.

-Name: Unlisted, zip code 91501 District: Unlisted

Listen to the community, they know what they need.

Q2: What values would you like to see the Probation Department and Probation Officers embrace as they carry out their Mission?

-Name: Phal Sok, District: 2

People are not “Offenders”, people are people.

The badge does not mean power.

The badge does not make the holder better.

Probation historically was created to tend to the needs of neglected and abandoned young people. Don’t forget that.

Be a listener.

Be non-threatening.

Do not yield the law as a punishment.

Be empathetic.

Just because the employees “Made it”, does not mean others are able to.

No two human experiences are the same.

Be strength based.

Transfer Hearings reports should be strengths based, not deficits based.

-Name: Bruce Patton, District: 2

Understand L.A. County communities recognize they have been abused by the Criminal Justice system. From Law Enforcement, Court System and Probation to Jails. The communities need the Probation Department and its officers to take less of a punishment oriented position and more of a position of Determined Enhancement of a Probationer’s ability to compete in today’s workplace.

***It must be stated that the residents of the LA County communities did not raise our children to be prison population and low wage workers.

-Name: Kim McGill (Youth Justice Coalition), zip code 90059 District: 2

1. Return to the original intention of Probation when John Augustus was appointed as the Nation’s first probation officer – community run, alternative to detention and incarceration – A true diversion from system involvement, not a widening of the net or a punitive supervision model.

2. Follow Probation’s own stated Mission and Values; shift from deficit based - seeing broken youth, families and communities to asset based - seeing and building on our strengths.

3. Change adherence to values by hiring differently. Replace all probation retirees, job transfers, people who are fired or resign with people from youth and community development, social work and education so the department includes coaches, teachers, counselors/therapists and youth and community development experts (In arts, job development, recreation, education and leadership development. Now Probation staff are mostly recruited from criminal justice schools.

4. Immediately establish a high level work group to address racism – disproportionate targeting and treatment of people of color at every level of the system.

5. Hire outside LA County and Outside Law Enforcement. Example: D.C, NY State and Missouri Culture and Program change happened with leadership that had no law enforcement experience – or much government experience – most were Justice Advocates.

6. Erase this language/these words from your department: Minor, Client, Juvenile, Deliquent, Offender/Ex-Offender, Minority, Ward, Probationer, Inmate. Rewrite the P.C. and W.I.C. to see us as human beings and not as career criminals. Stop calling by our last names or referring publicly to our charges.

-Name: Unlisted, District: 2

Include “Decarceration” (A reduction in jail population) as part of the mission of the department.

-Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

The values I’d like to see the Probation Department and officers embrace as they carry out their mission is act of surveillance and keeping face cams on them so that people of the community can access the evidence when incidents occur.

-Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

Valuing community experience and commitment requires rejecting the mindset that youth are manipulative and cannot be incentivized. Valuing youth as a culmination of their experiences and not a blank slate making “bad” decisions. Pay more attention to structures than individual choices. Stop punishing youth for the mistakes made and take the $8 billion and change how it looks and feels to live in impoverished neighborhoods.

-Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

Value people. The Probation Department needs to put the least first, the probationer, the officer in the prison. Flip the hierarchy. Judges last, prisons last. Just as an exercise to see what happens with the goal to have none or very few youth incarcerated. Goal for plan should be formed, staffed, funded so that there is a 60% - 80% reduction in incarcerations. Put the job #1 in engaging youth in their lives, let them live life and stop making them statistics – generation after generation in the case of black and brown people.

-Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

Department: Honesty, Equity, Transparency, Integrity, Collaboration.

Officers: DPO’s must embrace a spirit of humanitarian collegiality and a strong desire to provide opportunities for their clients to succeed and thrive. DPO’s should be dedicated to lifelong learning with an openness to collaboration. Training in the various disciplines represented by LA county departments: Mental Health, child and family services, etc…should be welcomed.

-Name: Unlisted, Zip Code: 90731, District: Unknown

Eliminate punitive language. Probation feels as though they are being reprimanded and forced to change. This is precisely what has been done to the incarcerated. The level of defensiveness and passive aggressiveness demonstrated by Probation is not indicative of a commitment to change/reform, but rather resistance to it. Probation must take accountability, drop their defensiveness, listen without an intention to respond (passive aggressively), and not position themselves as an authority figure, but instead a partner and public servant.

-Name: Unlisted, Zip Code: 91501, District: Unlisted

Trauma Informed Care/change your vocabulary.

Also there should be a social worker on this board.

October 25, 2018

Q1: What areas of adult services are most important for the POC to monitor?

Q1 Modified: What are the most important areas in the oversight of adult probation?  

-Name: Bruce Patton District: 2

Housing, education and jobs.

-Name: Alice Jones (Community Coalition) District: Unlisted

I am a construction contractor. My workers are summoned to make their appointments (scheduled or not) possibly losing employment.

It is not rocket science. The community is afraid to go through the chain of command iff they are intimidated by asking questions that they need to go to work.

What are repercussions for reporting complaints? My nephew’s probation was violated. He’s serving 16 months for Domestic Violence.

-Name: Unlisted District: Unlisted

-Ensuring clients get their record changed (reduced or expunged)

-Address family reunification and re-integration

-Other positive outcomes (Job/School/Home)

-Name: Nestor Valle (Community Coalition) District: Unlisted

It would seem two very high areas in adult probation services would be:

A: Housing for a portion of those individuals who may need it.

B: Mental Health concerns for those individuals who may also need it as well. Sober living homes. At minimum a type of referral format.

Q2: When it comes to adult services, how do we empower the POC to be effective in increasing accountability and transparency?

Q2 Modified: How can we empower the POC to be effective with this expanded oversight authority over adult and juvenile services?

-Name: Bruce Patton District: 2

By opening the POC up to the public for support and engagement.

-Name: Alice Jones (Community Coalition) District: Unlisted

I am a construction contractor. My workers are summoned to make their appointments (scheduled or not) possibly losing employment.

It is not rocket science. The community is afraid to go through the chain of command iff they are intimidated by asking questions that they need to go to work.

What are repercussions for reporting complaints? My nephew’s probation was violated. He’s serving 16 months for Domestic Violence.

-Name: Unlisted District: Unlisted

Same mechanisms needed for POC to be effective in all aspects:

-Subpoena power

-Outside counsel (not use County Counsel)

-Access to budgets and staffing info

-Power to make findings

-Power to conduct on-site inspections

-Power to conduct investigations

-Name: Nestor Valle (Community Coalition) District: Unlisted

“Adding teeth” to this committee seems to be a daunting prospect. Pitching motions are often solely heard within Judges Chambers. Subpoena Courts must grant these…then if not agreed, lawyers get involved. These must be placed on a ballot proposition or Senate Bill. Or, as mentioned, perhaps rewriting Probation/Parole Department Directives. Thank you.

November 14, 2018, Powers Of The Probation Oversight Commission

What does the Probation Oversight Commission need to do to ensure that the Probation Department has the following characteristics:  improved service delivery, services in the communities where people live, a planning process that engages residents, more contracts with Community Based Organizations?

Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

Residents would like to see that the resources given to Probation are used to provide the following:

Youth

  • Job training or teaching them a trade
  • Teach the youth upon release from camp what to do to be successful
  • Graduation/celebration for youth who successfully complete a program
  • Identification of or funding for businesses to hire youth
  • Programs/services for youth once they are back in the community

Adults

  • Housing
  • Jobs
  • Voting rights
  • Assist with Section 8
  • Create more opportunities and identify available resources in the community
  • Counseling services
  • Transitional services for those leaving prison to assist them with successfully re-integrating back into the community/society.
  • Prevent others from having the same outcome
  • Probationers want to do better but can’t because they don’t have access to the resources and support that they need

CBO’s

  • Assistance with the contracting process
  • More flexibility in how funds can be used. For example, a youth released back home contacts a CBO for services, the CBO indicates that based on their zip code (i.e., where the person lives) they are eligible for services; however, all available slots are currently filled.  The youth then contacts another CBO in a different area for services, the CBO indicates that space is available; however, based on your zip code we are unable to provide services to you.  CBOs should have the flexibility to provide services if a need is presented and should not be limited by zip codes.  Another example is a youth is released, but does not want to receive services in their neighborhood because the environment is not conducive to their success.  They would like to utilize available resources in another community, but their zip code dictates their eligibility for resources and where.  

Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

-Gather and report information

-Review detailed budget

-Understand landscape of services and gaps

-What are people’s charges – to assess need and causes of recidivism.

-Fund intervention workers in the county

-Independent body

-Community representation

-Committed to restoring justice

-Enforcement power

-Independent reporting office

-Justice – equity needs impact

Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

Contracts with Community Based Organizations. Meet with local key stakeholders to understand what service provider of color are present and how can they be lifted up to connect and receive funding for their work.

-How impactful are best practices in these communities

-CBO’s that are small – invest in programs/agencies that have been existent

-Define level of power for POC.

-Community representatives on POC

Name: Yvette Cardona (JJCC), District: Unlisted

-More preventative services.

-More resources for at risk youth.

-More mental health services for the at risk youth.

-More drug diversion programs.

Name: Unlisted District: Unlisted

  1. Youth prevention/At Risk in East Los Angeles
  2. Mentorship
  3. East LA needs funding
  4. Reeducate Probation office
  5. Ad hoc – youth

Name: Jeannette Hernandez District: Unlisted

More resources, programs, more mentors with “Life” experience. East Los Angeles has no programs. There are too many young teenagers and adults who have mental and drug issues with no drug diversion as well as too many homeless youth. We have a continuation school “S.E.A” that was shut down. We can use that as East LA’s main resource “Hub” for teen mothers, drug diversion, food bank, job training, mentoring a place to go to rather than the streets. I am a community activist willing to help assist. My son is an addict with no resources. The waiting list is way too long.

Name: Unlisted District: Unlisted

-Prevention Oversight Services

-Youth and Adults

-Assistance with employment

Name: Martha Jimenez District: Unlisted

To create a bill of rights for youth felons to be empowered to get access to knowing about what rights and access to resources and restorative justice they may have.

Name: Mariesa Samba (Community Coalition) District: Unlisted

-Streamline RFP process for the community

-Remove and/or limit law enforcement (POs) interruption with services /CBOs

Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

-Change the process on how community based programs can access more services.

-Provide capacity-building workshops to CBO’s, efforts led by Probation.

-Create a community engagement process so CBO’s can weigh in on the Internal Services Department.

-Formalize a process for the community to have an opportunity to engage.

-CAC should be more present at the PRIT POC Community Meetings to provide insight and input.

Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

First of all in order for there to be inclusion there needs to be more community stakeholders present, and the way to do this is by not having the community come to you but by you going to the community. There is no reason for the community to have to drive hours and hours to have just 10 to 15 minutes to speak on what you have decided for them to talk about!

Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

-Need ability to hold Department accountable.

-Needs to institute strength-based assessments.

-Needs to have oversight of bureaucracy and budget and systems transparency to be able to identify internal obstacles and create solutions.

-POC must have community members on the body and needs regular community input avenues and spaces.

-POC needs to hold department accountable to changes being implemented and report on that progress to the community.

Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

Hold Probation accountable.

Better program inside the walls to prepare for outside.

Mental Health Counseling Therapy.

Imagine if you had a therapist instead of a PO. Healing instead of an officer.

Contracts.

Give points to county contractors

Training project with teeth with real placement opportunities.

Millions of County construction projects.

Need community as part of Commission. Community needs a seat.

Accountability.

Advocates a census between Probation, Community, Schools, CBOs, Legal. Mental Health, Education, workforce development, Diversion prevention and Policy!

Name: Mariesa Samba (Community Coalition), District: Unlisted

-Streamline RFP process for the community

-Remove and/or limit law enforcement (POs) interruption with services/CBOs

-Formerly incarcerated and community stakeholders (mental health experts, educators) presence on oversight bodies.

High Priority Additional Services:

-Childcare options

-Affordable/transitional housing

-Transportation

-Mentorship

-Literacy

Equitable Reinvestment: Community Equity Fund

  • Equity = Black and Brown communities have historically suffered from disinvestment and criminalization and need more resources than those that benefit from the justice system.
  • Fund community based programs and services focused on reducing crime/poverty
  • Reinvest dollars from incarceration (prisons and law enforcement) to support youth and communities with high volumes of re-entry folks coming home.
  • Invest in prevention and intervention programs
  • Community oversight must be present to assure transparency and accountability

Community Pretrial Services: High Priority Services

  • Resource center to provide identification, court documentation and counseling
  • Employment, Education/Vocational training
  • Mental Health and wellness, social services counseling, rehab centers
  • Transportation to services providers/appointments
  • Housing and services for homeless (showers, toiletries, feminine products)
  • Legal counseling and advocacy
  • Affordable childcare options

System Wide Coordination: Barriers to Accessing Services

  • Financial resources
  • Network and communication between service providers
  • Probation does not outreach to the community because of its cash cow mentality
  • Community based pretrial agencies divert folks to downtown for services but should provide services in local communities (i.e. you live in South Central but get referrals for services all the way in Downtown)
  • Pretrial services and risk assessment must be:

-Removed from Probation. No law enforcement contact

-Outreach to community based service providers/grassroots orgs

-Independent from the county

-Release program with transitional housing support services

-Moral compass rooted in rehabilitation (love and care) not punishment (citations and violations) = restorative justice.

-Capacity building for service providers to maintain funding and #s

-Led by governing body with community presence including

      * Former Probationers and Juveniles

      * Mental Health experts

      * Educators and restorative justice practitioners

How do you feel about the Draft Mission Statement for the Probation Oversight Commission?  Does the draft Probation Oversight Commission Mission Statement fully represent what the Commission will do, the expected results and who it will be to its clients and stakeholders?  While keeping the statement concise, what could be changed or added to make it better?

Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

  • Consider it a “work in progress”
  • Do not like the word “re-imagine”
  • Nothing new – same words used before just said a little differently
  • Does not reflect a shift in the culture and how the department will view and treat the youth and the community
  • Not aggressive enough
  • Needs to say more about who they are and what they are about (e.g., youth justice coalition mission statement)
  • Something more empathetic
  • Should review the original mission/purpose of the Probation Department (1920’s) whose goal was to aid the neglected and abandoned individuals of our society and prioritize their needs

The following response is regarding the Composition of the POC:

  • Do not want the POC to be like LAPD’s Police Commission which is just a “rubber stamp” body of the Police Department
  • Composition of the POC should include:
  • System impacted individuals
  • Immigrants
  • LGBTQ
  • Faith-based organizations
  • Civil rights organizations
  • Composition of the POC should NOT include:
  • the traditional individuals, such as white males
  • law enforcement
  • The POC should have an independent, external auditor – should not use the County Auditor-Controller’s Office

Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

The keywords are accountability, transparency and healing as well as creating pathways to measure trust.

How will you investigate complaints? To what end?

Monitoring Public funds is redundant to the auditor.

Here is how I would measure the key roles and tasks of the POC. What ensures accountability? More reports? This is not consumable by the community. Who on the committee will be able to routinely measure these issues?

What lacks is timely data analyses for accountability and transparency for the department – so how will this POC meet this rather than add to it.

Name: Nestor Valle, District: Unlisted

The mission of the POC is to reform and reimagine the Probation services in the County of Los Angeles in order to achieve FULL accountability, transparency, and the healing of the people that are served by and working for the Probation Department. The POC shall create pathways for community engagement to foster trust and ensure the LA County Probation Department and the Board of Supervisors are monitoring its proper stewardship of public funds, adherence to the highest ethics, and the use of best practices in Probation.

Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

-Need more clarity/definition of what it means to “An advisor to the Probation Department”.

-Include the word Reform.

Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

Reimagine and reform are the key words. Reimagine comes from a place of privilege as if communities had the chance to imagine prior which hasn’t happened. The majority who get to “Reimagine” are white people and they are not the ones who are as impacted or even why we are here.

Name: Yvette Cardona, (JJCC) District: Unlisted

Clarify the accountability and transparency.

Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

It needs to include the community members and collaborating with them when the POC is erected.

Find a new word for Bestoutcomes.

The POC should “Reimagine and Recreate” Probation services. The POC with community members shall collaboratively create…

Name: Unlisted District: Unlisted

-Ad-hoc youth

-In group too.

Name: Unlisted District: Unlisted

Edit the mission statement with the highlighted words as follows:

The mission of the Probation Oversight Commission (“POC”) is to re-imagine DELIVERY OF VISIONARY probation services in the County of Los Angeles AND TANGIBLE EMPOWERMENT to achieve accountability, transparency, and healing of the people served by and working for the Probation Department. The POC shall create pathways for community engagement BY WORKING WITH THE TARGET POPULATION NEEDS AND ASPIRATIONS to foster trust and ensure the LA County Probation Department achieves the best outcomes for youth and adults on Probation. The POC will receive and investigate complaints to support the LA County Probation Department in carrying out its mission. Finally, the POC shall serve as an advisor to the Probation Department and the Board of Supervisors and monitor its proper stewardship of public funds, adherence to the highest ethics, and the use of best practices in Probation.

Name: Unlisted District: Unlisted

-“Accountability”….what does it mean?

-“How” will POC create pathways?

-“Needs” and aspirations of community they will be servicing

-Why does the mission statement not have rehabilitation?

-POC needs to keep these promises

Name: Martha Jimenez District: Unlisted

Best practices on Mission Statement and service delivery ideas to incorporate into the mission statement:

The Probation Oversight Commission should work from the needs and aspirations of the target population.

Establish tangible and measurable public policy setting goals and objectives.

To use census date tracts to allocate funding sources in different at risk communities in order to work on potential gang proliferation.

For the POC to allocate job creation programs to empower prior to becoming felons.

For POC to find a mechanism to work with the Legal Aid Foundation of LA to do expungement of criminal records for youth felons so that they may be reintegrated into society with a job.

To create a bill of rights for youth felons to be empowered to get access to knowing about what rights and access to resources and restorative justice they may have.

Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

The mission statement is ok. It needs a little more to it. Also not understanding what it means by the 2nd and 3rd sentence to achieve accountability/transparency and healing of the people served by and working for the Probation Department. This needs to be made clearer.

Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

POC should have policy input/oversight.

Name: Sasha Quintana and Chris Prouty, District: 3

*Needs more specific data to help support the mission and its success.

*Where are the actionable items? What is most important?

I have included my modifications in red to the Mission Statement below.

Mission Statement

The mission of the Probation Oversight Commission (“POC”) is to re-imagine (reform and restructure) probation services in the County of Los Angeles to achieve accountability, transparency, and healing of (rehabilitative path for) the people served by and working for the Probation Department. The POC shall create pathways for community engagement to foster trust and wider transparency and (to) ensure the LA County Probation Department achieves the best outcomes for youth and adults on Probation. The POC will receive and investigate complaints and community driven feedback to support the LA County Probation Department in carrying out its mission. Finally, the POC shall serve as an advisor to the Probation Department and the Board of Supervisors and monitor its proper stewardship of public funds, adherence to the highest ethics, and the use of best practices in Probation.

Name: Mariesa Samba (Community Coalition), District: Unlisted

It did not move me. It could have been any mission statement to any service-oriented agency.

Too academic and wordy.

December 12, 2018, Powers Of The Probation Oversight Commission

1. Give examples of what types of complaints should be investigated and resolved by the Probation Oversight Commission?

Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

All misconduct complaints, anytime a youth is disciplined or there has been a physical intervention. Use of restraints, verbal aggression, access to attorneys, medical and education.

Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

Complaints about systemic, pervasive and perceptible attitudes and behaviors that oppress and dehumanize affected individuals and/or their families. Another type of complaint to be investigated would be to pronounced bias and/or discriminatory policies and procedures that are demonstrably racist, sexist or designed to humiliate.

 

2. How (and by whom) should complaints be raised and how should they be resolved?

Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

By the person harmed, their attorney or representative. The commission should have the power to subpoena and make a finding. There should also be an appeal process.

Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

A robust and equitably accessible network of on-line and in-person opportunities to anonymously communicate complaints should be resolved by independent case managers.

 

3.    What should the Probation Oversight Commission be looking for when inspecting Probation facilities?

Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

Whether staff understand principles of youth development and trauma. Records of discipline, transport, medical, etc…Don’t rely on youth to tell you its not a safe setting to disclose abuse.

Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

The POC should focus attention on determining the efficacy of services , programs and opportunities that expand the numbers of strategies devoted to positive climate and rehabilitation such as education, employment and the arts.

 

4. What is unsatisfactory about how current inspections are conducted and followed up on?

Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

It’s not aligned with the “code” of secrecy that staff and youth both work under.

Name: Unlisted, District: Unlisted

 

By limiting the process of evaluating complaints and the nature of their fleeting and superficial symptomatic value, a punitive paradigm is perpetuated that precludes visionary solutions involving true rehabilitation.

January 1, 2019, Structured Decision Making

1. How do you think Structured Decision Making can support matching the right services to Probationers?

-SDM is or can be an effective process, but only as good as the source information that supports them and the people that are a part of the process of administrating them.

Name: Troy Vaughn (LAARP)

-Mirror what ODR/DA are doing with people with mental Health needs. Focusing on Diversion and Needs Assessment at every decision-making opportunity. The use of the current models of risk assessment are the status quo and have not been effective at supporting the people under the control of Probation. Accountability measures need to happen at the DMO.

-Focus the Probation Department’s work to reduce jail/camp populations and recidivism rates on the needs and asset assessment more than the risk assessment. The racial biases in the risk assessment tools will only increase incarceration populations.

-Focus more on individual needs and assets when deciding – What does the individual bring to the table? A risk assessment is a tool that was intended for SOCIAL WORKERS to gauge the experiences of clients and how that impacts a case plan and NOT used against the individual in sentencing.

-If SDM can be applied in a flow chart format, there would still be room for team consultation. Having the SDM in place, over time, may lead to increased collaboration among experts from the very fields identified – experts from the fields of homelessness, neuroscience, education, mental health, etc. LGBT biases are also of concern. We can’t pathologize behaviors, nor can we apply a formula as an approach with little scrutiny.

-Risk Assessments should be abolished. They are inherently racist and rooted in utilitarian and eugenic ideologies. Youth should be moved out of Probation and into ODR’s Office of Youth Diversion and Development.

-Needs Assessments, quality services, options, and self-determination by Probationers.

Quality services and options determined by SDM.

Name: Rami Christophi (Los Angeles County Office of Education – Title I)

-Consider build case plans that build on strengths and positive support systems. For youth and juveniles, it is possible to build on strength in the arts and creative activities through music, dance and visual arts. Youth are naturally attracted to the arts and the arts community can provide a wide variety of positive support systems to mentor youth and establish systems of care. It is clear that many young people struggle in traditional classroom settings but can shine in the areas of drawing, dancing or singing. With arts services, that one trauma-informed youth can quickly establish pathways to demonstrating their talent and accomplishments. The arts are unique in this powerful transformative potential.

 

2. How would you like for Probation to implement Structured Decision Making in their service delivery system?

-I think Probation should use other methods and consider the use of successful people (mentors), family members and other community stakeholders.

Name: Troy Vaughn (LAARP)

-Examine what other jurisdictions are doing and have done to examine RAI overrides to detain youth in order to reduce Racial and Ethnic Disparities (RRED). RRED grants were distributed to several counties in CA, such as San Joaquin County/Stockton.

-It needs assessment done at every decision making point. Other agencies do pre-trial, perhaps ODR.

-The Probation Department, PRIT, and POC must engage the service providers that are on the ground, doing the work and providing the services daily in the most underserved communities. Start reaching out to these folks providing gang intervention, mental health and treatment services to be a part of this process. We must break down any barriers to people (youth and adult) who need the services.

-Focus on strength-based assessments and move away from a risk assessment tool as the determining factor. Utilize an open ended question assessment that forces Probation Officers to engage and build relationships with individuals in order to decide.

-SDM, ideally, would take into consideration relevant trends that impact the behaviors deemed as criminal. More youth (and adults) face great levels of housing instability, homelessness and food insecurity. Finding a rooftop to sleep on, or basic needs to steal, etc…are part of this current crisis of our economy in LA County. Many people don’t have a permanent address, so they may not receive notice of tickets or court dates due to lack of a current mailing address, and acquiring a warrant as a result. (LGBT Center of Los Angeles, LAHSA, John Burton Advocates)

-I work with Title I Funding at the Juvenile Court Schools. Title I requires a School Site Council (SSC) to administer the spending of the funds. In a democratic manner. With elections of members and a requirement for various stakeholders, the SSC has direct control over the funds. In a similar matter, the SDM committee should include Probation Officers, Probation leaders, parents, community based organizations, probationers (former or current), and other stakeholders, bylaws, elections, guidelines work best.

Name: Rami Christophi (Los Angeles County Office of Education – Title I)

-Probation can focus on after-care for children, youth and families that strengthen collaboration with inter-generational arts activities as the key to promoting positive communication and self-expression. Probation can collaborate with the LA County Arts Commission to implement appropriate arts activities as related to celebrating the accomplishments of youth and building on their strengths. The arts instruction component can be the means to reward youth with stipends and employment opportunities. LA County has an enormous “Creative Economy” with high paying jobs.